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Biographies & Writings

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  1. A Girl Among the Anarchists

    A Girl Among the Anarchists

    $12.00

    Originally published in 1903, this is a cracking novel, on the turn of the century British anarchist movement, and the role of women therein. The narrator, Isabel Meredith is the pseudonym of Helen and Olivia Rossetti, daughters of William Michael Rossetti and nieces of Dante Gabriel Rossetti. Their fin-de-siecle tenure as editors of the renowned British anarchist journal The Torch provided the experience that went into this entertaining and knowing novel. Includes an introduction by Jennifer Shaddock. Learn More
  2. Abbie Hoffman: American Rebel

    Abbie Hoffman: American Rebel

    $15.00

    In this sympathetic history of a maligned decade, Marty Jezer, a fellow antiwar activist, details Abbie Hoffman's humor, manic energy, depressive spells, political skills, & above all, his incurable & still contagious optimism. He presents a thoughtful, solidly researched biography of the wildly creative & iconoclastic Yippie, portraying Hoffman as a fresh force in American political culture. Jezer surveys in detail the politics, philosophies, & struggles of the antiwar movement. Learn More
  3. Autobiography of Mother Jones

    Autobiography of Mother Jones

    $12.00

    In this classic work of American nonfiction the greatest labor organizer in US history details her three quarters century fight for labor's liberation, and her unswerving belief in industrial unionism as the key to that struggle. In steel, railroading, metal mining, textiles, and above all, the coal industry, Mother Jones fought alongside strikers. Here too is the exciting story of her crusade against child labor, her innovative efforts to organize working women, her experiences in court and in jail, and her daring involvement in the Mexican Revolution. Mother Jones' lively narrative—every page bristling with her characteristic humor, indignation, and uncommon sense—is a masterpiece of American radicalism. This abundantly illustrated, new edition includes a host of valuable additions. In a new foreword, Meridel LeSueur vividly recalls her 1914 meeting with Mother Jones. IWW historian Fred Thompson's afterword provides useful background and fills in important gaps in Mother Jones' story. Also included are a Mother Jones article from 1901, a tribute by Eugene V. Debs, an introduction by Clarence Darrow, helpful annotations to the text, a full bibliography, and an index.
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  4. Beyond Borders: The selected essays of Mary Austin

    Beyond Borders: The selected essays of Mary Austin

    $12.50

    Seventeen essays by Mary Hunter Austin (1868–1934), author of the western classic The Land of Little Rain (1903), demonstrate her wide-ranging interests and equally varied writing styles. Although she was born in Carlinville, Illinois, and graduated from Blackburn College, Mary Austin spent most of her writing career in California, New York, and finally Sante Fe, New Mexico. A well-known, popular, and prolific writer, Austin published thirty-three books and three plays and was closely associated with many important literary figures of her time, including H. G. Wells, George Bernard Shaw, Mabel Dodge Luhan, Jack London, and Willa Cather. Still best known today for her nature writing and southwestern cultural studies, Austin has been increasingly recognized for her work on feminist themes, including the play The Arrow Maker, the nonfiction The Young Woman Citizen, and the novels A Woman of Genius and No. 26 Jayne Street. What has been perhaps an overemphasis on Austin’s nature writing has, since her death, eclipsed the fact that Austin was known during her lifetime as a colorful, eccentric, and controversial person whose direct and outspoken opinions engaged a wide variety of topics. Beyond Borders demonstrates that variety. In addition to her monographs, Austin also published her short fiction and essays in periodicals. In fact, like many a writer earning a living from her work, Austin wrote prolifically for the magazine market, producing during her career over two hundred individual pieces published in over sixty periodicals. Although a collection of her short fiction appeared in 1987, Austin’s nonfiction periodical work has remained uncollected until now. In support of Austin’s essays, Reuben J. Ellis provides an introduction that establishes a biographical and historical context for Austin’s work. In addition, each Austin essay is prefaced by brief introductory remarks by the editor. A selected bibliography of Austin’s essays is also included. Learn More
  5. C. Wright Mills: Letters and Autobiographical Writing

    C. Wright Mills: Letters and Autobiographical Writing

    $5.00

    Mills's letters to prominent figures--including Saul Alinsky, Daniel Bell, Lewis Coser, Carlos Fuentes, Hans Gerth, Irving Howe, Dwight MacDonald, Robert K. Merton, Ralph Miliband, William Miller, David Riesman, and Harvey Swados--are joined by his letters to family members, letter-essays to an imaginary friend in Russia, personal narratives by his daughters, and annotations drawing on published and unpublished material, including the FBI file on Mills. Learn More
  6. Carl Sandburg: The People's Pugilist

    Carl Sandburg: The People's Pugilist

    $16.00

    Edited and Introduced by Matthias Regan

    Carl Sandburg is widely known as the 'great' poet from Illinois, and especially remembered for his monumental three-volume biographical study of Abraham Lincoln. He was also a journalist, author of children's stories, and pathbreaking songwriter. This new collection of his writings conveys the excitement and tragedy of his times and his commitment to a movement for change.

    'Like the Wobbly's favorite son, Joe Hill, Sandburg created a rabble-rousing persona in order to provoke a revolution in everyday life. Sandburg's prose brings the romantic figure of the modern poet as a polemicist, an orator for the people, together with the figure of the journalist as a gallant, acerbic muckraker. This figure becomes a vehicle from which to disseminate a radical vision of modern democracy. The articulation of this modern world-view was what composed the Charles H. Kerr Company's 'house style' for its Review, making it a forerunner of such crucial modernist literary organs as Poetry magazine; indeed, it was in the Review, not Poetry magazine, that the best of Sandburg's Chicago Poems first appeared.' [From the introduction]

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  7. From Here to There: the Staughton Lynd Reader

    From Here to There: the Staughton Lynd Reader

    $18.00

    Edited by Andrej Grubacic

    This collection of unpublished talks and hard-to-find essays from legendary activist-historian Staughton Lynd blends themes that encourage the rejection of capitalist imperialism, while also seeking a transition to a newly organized world. The dynamic collection provides reminiscence and analysis of the 1960s and a vision of how historians might immerse themselves in popular movements while maintaining their obligation to tell the truth. A final group of presentations, entitled “Possibilities,” explores nonviolence, resistance to empire as a way of life, and what a working-class self-activity might mean in the 21st century.

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  8. Harlem Glory

    Harlem Glory

    $12.00

    A Fragment of Aframerican Life

    by Claude McKay

    Written in the late 1940s but unpublished till now, this superb portrayal of Black life during the Great Depression and the New Deal is virtually a sequel to the classic Home to Harlem. Mckay's vivid, warm evocations of the omnipresent numbers racket, all-night jazz parties and the whole exuberant and cacophonous clash of social movements and ideologies - Black nationalism and industrial unionism as well as incipient Muslim and other heterodox religious formations - provide the context for a fast-paced narrative of love, work, play and revolt in Black America during one of the most stirring periods in US history. Astutely sensitive to the extraordinary vitality and diversity of Black culture, and drawing on the author's experiences in the IWW and the extreme Left of the socialist movement, Harlem Glory reveals Claude McKay at his very best.

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  9. Haymarket Scrapbook: 125th Anniversary Edition

    Haymarket Scrapbook: 125th Anniversary Edition

    $23.00

    Marking the 125th anniversary of the 1886 bombing at Chicago's Haymarket Square, in a revised and expanded edition co-published with the Charles H. Kerr Company, this profusely illustrated anthology reproduces hundreds of original documents, speeches, posters, and handbills, as well as contributions by many of today's finest labor and radical historians focusing on Haymarket's enduring influence around the world—including the eight-hour workday. Learn More
  10. In Quest of Heaven

    In Quest of Heaven

    $20.00

    The Story of the Sunrise Co-operative Farm Community

    by Joseph J. Cohen

    In 1933 a group of workers from New York, Detroit, and Chicago purchased the fourteen square mile Prarie Farm in Michigan's Saginaw Valley. This is the story of the libertarian collectivist colony known as the Sunrise Co-operative Farm Community. Written by its founder, Joseph J. Cohen, and first published by the Sunrise History Publishing Committee in 1957, In Quest of Heaven describes the growth and development of the colony and offers insight into why it ultimately failed.

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