Welcome Fellow Worker,

American Labor

Books about Labor

Items 1 to 10 of 56 total

per page
Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5

Grid  List 

Set Descending Direction
  1. A New South Rebellion

    A New South Rebellion

    $15.00

    The Battle Against Convict Labor in the Tennessee Coalfields, 1871-1896

    by Karin A. Shapiro

    In 1891, thousands of Tennessee miners rose up against the use of convict labor by the state's coal companies, eventually engulfing five mountain communities in a rebellion against government authority. Propelled by the insurgent sensibilities of Populism and Gilded Age unionism, the miners initially sought to abolish the convict lease system through legal challenges and legislative lobbying. When nonviolent tactics failed to achieve reform, the predominantly white miners repeatedly seized control of the stockades and expelled the mostly black convicts from the mining districts. Insurrection hastened the demise of convict leasing in Tennessee, though at the cost of greatly weakening organized labor in the state's coal regions.

    Exhaustively researched and vividly written, A New South Rebellion brings to life the hopes that rural southerners invested in industrialization and the political tensions that could result when their aspirations were not met. Karin Shapiro skillfully analyzes the place of convict labor in southern economic development, the contested meanings of citizenship in late-nineteenth-century America, the weaknesses of Populist-era reform politics, and the fluidity of race relations during the early years of Jim Crow. 

    Learn More
  2. A Tale of Three Cities

    A Tale of Three Cities

    $10.00

    A Tale of Three Cities: Labor Organization and Protest in Paterson, Passaic, and Lawrence, 1916-1921

    by David J. Goldberg

    A history of efforts by textile workers in Paterson and Passaic, New Jersey, and Lawrence, Mass., to organize a permanent industrial union between 1916 and 1921, efforts that built upon earlier IWW campaigns but were ultimately unable to overcome internal divisions.

    Learn More
  3. Am I My Brother's Keeper?

    Am I My Brother's Keeper?

    $14.00

    A Study of British Columbia's Labor & Oriental Problems

    by Agnes C. Laut

    Just before the outbreak of the Great War, members of the Industrial Workers of the World—the infamous Wobblies who enlivened the nightmares of capitalists across North America—went on strike in British Columbia, calling for humane conditions. The action followed years of racist incidents in BC against 'Orientals' (Chinese, Japanese and Indians). In the mind of Central Canada, these two obviously distinct facts were somehow linked, if only by the province's climate of extremism. Saturday Night, a fearless champion of the overdog, sent the popular historian Agnes Laut to investigate. Her articles—outwardly so reasonable to Canadian ears at the time but now shocking and repulsive for their bigotry and hatred—were so popular that they were quickly reprinted in pamphlet form. The work was entitled Am I My Brother's Keeper? Only a few copies survived—and these have been gathering dust for ninety years. Now this curious piece of propaganda has been republished with great care, with a contextualizing introduction by Mark Leier, the author of Where the Fraser River Flows: The Industrial Workers of the World in British Columbia and other important works in Canadian labor history. For all its incendiary falseness, the text speaks to us clearly of how labor, race, immigration, radicalism and gender were understood (and practiced) in western Canada at the time.

     

    Learn More
  4. American Labor and the Cold War

    American Labor and the Cold War

    $10.00

    Grassroots Politics and Postwar Political Culture

    Edited by Robert W. Cherney, William Issel, and Kieran Walsh Taylor

    'This book is one of the most outstanding of recent years in all the history of U.S. labor, and nearly alone in tackling the complexities at the cross-section of Left politics and unionism.' ––Paul Buhle, senior lecturer in American Civilization, Brown University, and co-editor of The Encyclopedia of the American Left

    The American labor movement seemed poised on the threshold of unparalleled success at the beginning of the post-World War II era. Fourteen million strong in 1946, unions represented thirty five percent of non-agricultural workers. Why then did the gains made between the 1930s and the end of the war produce so few results by the 1960s?

    This collection addresses the history of labor in the postwar years by exploring the impact of the global contest between the United States and the Soviet Union on American workers and labor unions. The essays focus on the actual behavior of Americans in their diverse workplaces and communities during the Cold War. Where previous scholarship on labor and the Cold War has overemphasized the importance of the Communist Party, the automobile industry, and Hollywood, this book focuses on politically moderate, conservative workers and union leaders, the medium-sized cities that housed the majority of the population, and the Roman Catholic Church. These are all original essays that draw upon extensive archival research and some upon oral history sources.

     

    Learn More
  5. American Workers, American Unions (The American Moment)

    American Workers, American Unions (The American Moment)

    $17.95

    When published in 1986, American Workers, American Unions was among the first efforts to trace the contentious relationships among workers, unions, business, and the state from World War I through the mid-1980s. In this revised edition Robert Zieger makes use of recent scholarship and bibliographical material to provide a detailed examination of the key issues of the 1980s and 1990s.

    'I have used Robert Zieger's American Workers, American Unions in undergraduate courses on labor history and industrial relations. This new edition brings the story up to today--and the new, updated bibliographical essay is a plus for college courses.'--Darryl Holter, Institute of Industrial Relations, University of California, Los Angeles.

    'A helping of sober truth about the American labor movement and its politics.'--John C. Cort, New Oxford Review

    Learn More
  6. Autobiography of Mother Jones

    Autobiography of Mother Jones

    $12.00

    In this classic work of American nonfiction the greatest labor organizer in US history details her three quarters century fight for labor's liberation, and her unswerving belief in industrial unionism as the key to that struggle. In steel, railroading, metal mining, textiles, and above all, the coal industry, Mother Jones fought alongside strikers. Here too is the exciting story of her crusade against child labor, her innovative efforts to organize working women, her experiences in court and in jail, and her daring involvement in the Mexican Revolution. Mother Jones' lively narrative—every page bristling with her characteristic humor, indignation, and uncommon sense—is a masterpiece of American radicalism. This abundantly illustrated, new edition includes a host of valuable additions. In a new foreword, Meridel LeSueur vividly recalls her 1914 meeting with Mother Jones. IWW historian Fred Thompson's afterword provides useful background and fills in important gaps in Mother Jones' story. Also included are a Mother Jones article from 1901, a tribute by Eugene V. Debs, an introduction by Clarence Darrow, helpful annotations to the text, a full bibliography, and an index.
    Learn More
  7. Big Trouble

    Big Trouble

    $15.00

    A Murder in a Small Western Town Sets off a Struggle for the Soul of America

    by J. Anthony Lukas

     

    Hailed as 'toweringly important' (Baltimore Sun), 'a work of scrupulous and significant reportage' (E. L. Doctorow), and 'an unforgettable historical drama' (Chicago Sun-Times), Big Trouble brings to life the astonishing case that ultimately engaged President Theodore Roosevelt, Supreme Court justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, and the politics and passions of an entire nation at century's turn.

    After Idaho's former governor is blown up by a bomb at his garden gate at Christmastime 1905, America's most celebrated detective, Pinkerton James McParland, takes over the investigation. His daringly executed plan to kidnap the radical union leader 'Big Bill' Haywood from Colorado to stand trial in Idaho sets the stage for a memorable courtroom confrontation between the flamboyant prosecutor, progressive senator William Borah, and the young defender of the dispossessed, Clarence Darrow.

    Big Trouble captures the tumultuous first decade of the twentieth century, when capital and labor, particularly in the raw, acquisitive West, were pitted against each other in something close to class war.

    Lukas paints a vivid portrait of a time and place in which actress Ethel Barrymore, baseball phenom Walter Johnson, and editor William Allen White jostled with railroad magnate E. H. Harriman, socialist Eugene V. Debs, gunslinger Charlie Siringo, and Operative 21, the intrepid Pinkerton agent who infiltrated Darrow's defense team. This is a grand narrative of the United States as it charged, full of hope and trepidation, into the twentieth century. Learn More
  8. Blue Jenkins: Working for Workers

    Blue Jenkins: Working for Workers

    $15.00

    When William "Blue" Jenkins was only 6 months old, he moved with his parents from a Mississippi sharecropper's farm to the industrial city of Racine, Wisconsin with dreams of a new life. As an African-American in the pre-civil rights era, Blue came face to face with racism: the Ku Klux Klan hung a black figure in effigy from a tree in the Jenkins family's yard. Growing up, Blue knew where blacks could shop, eat, and get a job in Racine - and where they couldn't. The injustices that confronted Blue in his young life would drive his desire to make positive changes to his community and workplace in adulthood. This new title in the Badger Biographies series shares Blue Jenkins's story as it acquaints young readers with African-American and labor history. Following an all-star career as a high school football player, Blue became involved in unions through his work at Belle City Malleable. As World War II raged on, he participated in the home-front battle against discrimination in work, housing, and economic opportunity. When Blue became president of the union at Belle City, he organized blood drives and fought for safety regulations. He also helped to integrate labor union offices. In 1962, he became president of the U.A.W. National Foundry in the Midwest, and found himself in charge of 50,000 foundry union members. Labor leader, civil rights activist, and family man, Blue shows readers how the fight for workers' and minorities' rights can be fought and won through years of hard work. Learn More
  9. C. Wright Mills: Letters and Autobiographical Writing

    C. Wright Mills: Letters and Autobiographical Writing

    $5.00

    Mills's letters to prominent figures--including Saul Alinsky, Daniel Bell, Lewis Coser, Carlos Fuentes, Hans Gerth, Irving Howe, Dwight MacDonald, Robert K. Merton, Ralph Miliband, William Miller, David Riesman, and Harvey Swados--are joined by his letters to family members, letter-essays to an imaginary friend in Russia, personal narratives by his daughters, and annotations drawing on published and unpublished material, including the FBI file on Mills. Learn More
  10. Calling Home

    Calling Home

    $22.00

    Working Class Women's Writings

    an anthology edited and with an introduction by Janet Zandy

    'A powerful and uncompromising collection of essays, stories, poems, and oral histories, and more, reflecting the history and personal experiences of workingclass women in America.'--Booklist

    'This unique collection evokes the little-heard voices of the women who form the very underpinnings of our society.'--Booklist

    Learn More

Items 1 to 10 of 56 total

per page
Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5

Grid  List 

Set Descending Direction