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Politics & Economics

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  1. Abolish Restaurants: A Worker's Critique of the Food Service Industry

    Abolish Restaurants: A Worker's Critique of the Food Service Industry

    $6.95

    A 60-page illustrated guide to the daily misery, stress, boredom, and alienation of restaurant work, as well as the ways restaurant workers fight against it. Drawing on a range of anticapitalist ideas as well as a heaping plate of personal experience, it is part analysis and part call-to-arms. Learn More
  2. Animal Rights

    Animal Rights

    $18.00

    In the past decade, philosopher Bernard Rollin points out, we have "witnessed a major revolution in social concern with animal welfare and the moral status of animals." Adopting the stance of a moderate, Harold Guither attempts to provide an unbiased examination of the paths and goals of the members of the animal rights movement and of its detractors. Given the level of confusion, suspicion, misunderstanding, and mistrust between the two sides, Guither admits the difficulty in locating, much less staying in, the middle of the road. The philosophical conflict, however, is fairly clear: those who resist reform, fearing that radical change in the treatment of animals will infringe on their business and property rights, versus the new activists who espouse a different set of moral and ethical obligations toward animals. From his position as a moderate, Guither presents a brief history of animal protection and the emergence of animal rights, describes the scope of the movement, and identifies major players such as Paul and Linda McCartney and organizations such as People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals that are actively involved in the movement. He concentrates on what is actually happening in the 1990s, discussing in detail the possible consequences of the current debate for those who own, use, or enjoy animals in entertainment and leisure pursuits. A reference work for students in animal sciences and veterinary medicine, the book also poses questions for philosophers, sociologists, and public policymakers as well as animal owners, animal and biomedical researchers, and manufacturers and distributors of animal equipment and supplies. Learn More
  3. Ecopolitics: Building a Green Society

    Ecopolitics: Building a Green Society

    $10.00

    Where do you place the blame for the environmental crisis-too many people? consumer greed? technology gone amok? And what do you think will save our planet-birth control? appropriate technology? recycling? eco-consumerism? Those solutions are just "Band-Aids on a bleeding Earth," argues environmental activist Daniel A. Coleman. Where conventional wisdom sees both the cause of the environmental crisis and its cure in individual actions, Coleman says: Look again. By blaming ourselves as individuals, we let governments and corporations off the hook. Making "50 simple" changes in our personal lifestyles is worthwhile, but must not divert our attention from the underlying causes of environmental disaster. The real causes are rooted deep in the politics of human affairs-and so are their solutions.We should be asking: Why do we allow such harm to our environment? How did we create a society with no stake in the future? How can we build a green society? The good news is that we can reverse the process of environmental abuse. Political strategies driven by the key values of ecological responsibility, participatory democracy, environmental justice, and community action are effective. Dan Coleman's stories of citizen groups whose grassroots organizing has already put ecologically sound policies in place demonstrate that the sustainable society is indeed possible. Lucid, lively, probing, serious, yet optimistic-Coleman's analysis is required reading for all who count the earth as their home. Learn More
  4. Iron & Steel: Class, Race, and Community in Birmingham, Alabama 1875-1920

    Iron & Steel: Class, Race, and Community in Birmingham, Alabama 1875-1920

    $10.00

    In this study of Birmingham's iron and steel workers, Henry McKiven unravels the complex connections between race relations and class struggle that shaped the city's social and economic order. He also traces the links between the process of class formation and the practice of community building and neighborhood politics. According to McKiven, the white men who moved to Birmingham soon after its founding to take jobs as skilled iron workers shared a free labor ideology that emphasized opportunity and equality between white employees and management at the expense of less skilled black laborers. But doubtful of their employers' commitment to white supremacy, they formed unions to defend their position within the racial order of the workplace. This order changed, however, when advances in manufacturing technology created more semiskilled jobs and broadened opportunities for black workers. McKiven shows how these race and class divisions also shaped working-class life away from the plant, as workers built neighborhoods and organized community and political associations that reinforced bonds of skill, race, and ethnicity. Learn More
  5. Managers and Workers: Origins of the Twentieth-Century Factory System in the United States, 1880–1920

    Managers and Workers: Origins of the Twentieth-Century Factory System in the United States, 1880–1920

    $15.00

    During the early years of this century, the classic factory system of the industrial revolution evolved rapidly into a new, identifiable form that would characterize American and world industry for most of the twentieth century. This transformation, as important for industrial managers, workers, and consumers as the initial creation of the factory, is the subject of Daniel Nelson’s illuminating synthesis, updated and expanded to include the scholarship of recent decades. This edition of Managers and Workers describes the interrelations between technological and organizational innovation, including such familiar developments as the spread of mass production and the emergence of scientific management, and other developments that were little known when the first edition of this book appeared, such as the revolution in factory architecture, the changing role of the foreman, and the spread of personnel work. The volume also incorporates the best scholarship of the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s, some of it stimulated by Managers and Workers, and includes a new chapter on the role of organized labor in the early twentieth-century factory. The focus of the work, however, remains the individual managers and workers who created the twentieth-century factory system. The preeminent historian of the American business firm, Alfred D. Chandler Jr. reviewed the first edition of Managers and Workers in The Journal of Economic History, predicting that this book would “long remain the standard work on the origins of the American factory.” The second edition will make that prediction true for the 1990s and beyond. Learn More
  6. News of the Spanish Revolution

    News of the Spanish Revolution

    $6.00

    Members of the North American revolutionary syndicalist union Industrial Workers of the World (I.W.W.) have always followed international struggles with great interest. In 1936, when the Spanish Revolution began, they were inspired by the part played by the anarchist-led Spanish labor union confederation, the CNT, and the endeavor to create a self-governing egalitarian society. From the IWWs critical understanding of the danger posed by the authoritarian left, including the Communist parties of the world and the government of the Soviet Union, they were on their guard against the behavior of these groups in Spain. In the IWW press people like Joseph Wagner wrote and translated articles about the Spanish situation, offering alternative perspectives not available in either the Communist or liberal press. This collection contains some of these articles, offering a sample of what English-speaking anti-authoritarians could read about the Spanish Revolution in the late 1930s. In addition, the pamphlet contains two articles published later about participants experiences. One is by Russell Blackwell, who became an anarcho-syndicalist as a result of his experiences in Spain. The final article is about Federico Arcos, a Spanish anarchist veteran of the revolution. It provides a glimpse into what the anarchists of Spain experienced and what the participation of international fighters who went to Spain meant to them. Learn More
  7. Organizing Wall to Wall

    Organizing Wall to Wall

    $2.00

    A history by Peter Rachleff of the Independent Union of All Workers (IUAW), a militant, industrial union formed in the meat packing plants of Minnesota in the 1930s. Learn More
  8. Prison Industrial Complex For Beginners

    Prison Industrial Complex For Beginners

    $15.95

    Prison Industrial Complex For Beginners is a graphic narrative project that attempts to distill the fundamental components of what scholars, activists, and artists have identified as the Mass Incarceration movement in the United States. Since the early 1990s, activist critics of the US prison system have marked its emergence as a “complex” in a manner comparable to how President Eisenhower described the Military Industrial Complex. Like its institutional “cousin,” the Prison Industrial Complex features a critical combination of political ideology, far-reaching federal policy, and the neo-liberal directive to privatize institutions traditionally within the purview of the government. The result is that corporations have capital incentives to capture and contain human bodies. The Prison Industrial Complex relies on the “law and order” ideology fomented by President Nixon and developed at least partially in response to the unrest generated through the Civil Rights Movement. It is (and has been) enhanced and emboldened via the US “war on drugs,” a slate of policies that by any account have failed to do anything except normalize the warehousing of nonviolent substance abusers in jails and prisons that serve more as criminal training centers then as redemptive spaces for citizens who might re-enter society successfully. Prison Industrial Complex For Beginners is a primer for how these issues emerged and how our awareness of the systems at work in mass incarceration might be the very first step in reforming an institution responsible for some of our most egregious contemporary civil rights violations. Learn More
  9. Radical Works for Rebel Workers: Best of the IW 2015

    Radical Works for Rebel Workers: Best of the IW 2015

    $7.00

    Radical Works for Rebel Workers is a hand-picked collection of contemporary writing and imagery from a diverse crowd for the annual Working Writers Contest of the IWW. This Bilingual booklet features 10 contemporary works dealing with sexism, organizing, labor history and how to be a lifelong wobbly. Get two, and remember: IWW literature is better shared with a fellow worker! Learn More
  10. Red Hunting in the Promised Land

    Red Hunting in the Promised Land

    $18.95

    Anticommunism and the making of America

    by Joel Kovel

    In the wake of the cold war, an eminent social critic examines the roots of America's anticommunist frenzy. What amounted to an American civil religion for nearly half a century was at least as much a spiritual as a political phenomenon, according to Joel Kovel. It succeeded because it mobilized fears about our own social and individual identities against a demonized enemy. Organized around a series of compelling portraits of leading politicians and ideologues, Red Hunting in the Promised Land traces the evolution of anticommunism from the time of the Bolshevik Revolution to the collapse of Communism in our time. Beginning with the great red scare of 1919, Kovel goes on to explore the diabolic imaginings of Father Coughlin and his brand of anti-Semitic anticommunism; George Kennan and his elitist vision of the national security state; John Foster Dulles and the apocalyptic world of 'massive retaliation'; J. Edgar Hoover and the paranoia of socio-sexual repression; Joe McCarthy and the right-wing populism of the 'American Inquisition'; Hubert Humphrey and the strange career of liberal anticommunism; James Angleton and the knight errantry of anticommunism at the CIA; and lastly the denouement of the 'Evil Empire' in the age of Ronald Reagan and George Bush. Cold war anticommunism was not the first of our great 'red scares.' Kovel points out that the original, far more extended 'red scare' was the European reaction to indigenous peoples, or Native Americans, who had to be diabolized so that their lands could be expropriated. What is it about America that has made both our leadership and the public repeatedly prone to hunt enemies in great crusades of moral absolutism? By shifting attention from its object, Communism, to its subject, American civilization, the book challenges the basic understanding of the nature of anticommunism. It draws connections between anticommunism as an internal control mechanism and anticommunism as the instrument of foreign policy, relat 

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