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Search results for 'direct ation and sabotage'

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  1. $25 Books to Incarcerated Workers Donation

    $25 Books to Incarcerated Workers Donation

    $25.00

    The IWW Literature Department and IWOC (Incarcerated Workers Organizing Committee) are working together to get radical books to incarcerated fellow workers. Your donation will help to cover shipping costs so that radical literature can reach union members doing the crucial work of organizing in prisons. Learn More
  2. $15 Books to Incarcerated Workers Donation

    $15 Books to Incarcerated Workers Donation

    $15.00

    The IWW Literature Department and IWOC (Incarcerated Workers Organizing Committee) are working together to get radical books to incarcerated fellow workers. Your donation will help to cover shipping costs so that radical literature can reach union members doing the crucial work of organizing in prisons. Learn More
  3. $10 Books to Incarcerated Workers Donation

    $10 Books to Incarcerated Workers Donation

    $10.00

    The IWW Literature Department and IWOC (Incarcerated Workers Organizing Committee) are working together to get radical books to incarcerated fellow workers. Your donation will help to cover shipping costs so that radical literature can reach union members doing the crucial work of organizing in prisons. Learn More
  4. $5 Books to Incarcerated Workers Donation

    $5 Books to Incarcerated Workers Donation

    $5.00

    The IWW Literature Department and IWOC (Incarcerated Workers Organizing Committee) are working together to get radical books to incarcerated fellow workers. Your donation will help to cover shipping costs so that radical literature can reach union members doing the crucial work of organizing in prisons. Learn More
  5. $1 Books to Incarcerated Workers Donation

    $1 Books to Incarcerated Workers Donation

    $1.00

    The IWW Literature Department and IWOC (Incarcerated Workers Organizing Committee) are working together to get radical books to incarcerated fellow workers. Your donation will help to cover shipping costs so that radical literature can reach union members doing the crucial work of organizing in prisons. Learn More
  6. Support Books to Incarcerated Workers

    Support Books to Incarcerated Workers

    Starting at: $1.00

    The IWW Literature Department and IWOC (Incarcerated Workers Organizing Committee) are working together to get radical books to incarcerated fellow workers. Your donation will help to cover shipping costs so that radical literature can reach union members doing the crucial work of organizing in prisons. Learn More
  7. The Prison-Industrial Complex and the Global Economy

    The Prison-Industrial Complex and the Global Economy

    $3.00

    The prison business in the US is not based on locking up, punishing, or rehabilitating dangerous people. Follow the money and find how the prison-industrial complex fits into the New World Order of free trade and imprisoned people, the war on drugs, and capital flight. Learn More
  8. Abolish Restaurants: A Worker's Critique of the Food Service Industry

    Abolish Restaurants: A Worker's Critique of the Food Service Industry

    $6.95

    A 60-page illustrated guide to the daily misery, stress, boredom, and alienation of restaurant work, as well as the ways restaurant workers fight against it. Drawing on a range of anticapitalist ideas as well as a heaping plate of personal experience, it is part analysis and part call-to-arms. Learn More
  9. The Strait

    The Strait

    $6.00

    Obenabi, the narrator, sings the story of his people confronting the European Invader. Emerging from the remembered experiences of his grandmothers, these personal tales of conflict, commerce, domestication, heroism, exchange and love are set in the Great Lakes region of North America. Most take place in splendid natural surroundings within walking distance of the Strait (now Detroit). Learn More
  10. Black Detroit and the rise of the UAW

    Black Detroit and the rise of the UAW

    $8.50

    The political alliance between the United Auto Workers and the NAACP-led blacks of Detroit blossomed with Walter Reuther's becoming a member of the board of the NAACP and marching with Martin Luther King. In retrospect it seemed to the matchmakers, like R. J. Thomas of the UAW and Walter White of the NAACP, like a marriage made in heaven. But Meier and Rudwick, who have written extensively on black issues, demonstrate that it was a relationship that was forged slowly and painfully through the organizing struggles of the New Deal and World War II. At first, black auto workers resisted unionization. Henry Ford had taken a paternal interest in them and given them more jobs, better pay, and better living conditions than any other employer. With their loyalty to Ford, suspicion of racist white workers, fear of the seniority system, under-representation in union offices, and concentration in the worst jobs, black workers were ripe to be used as strikebreakers. Working through his vicious Service Department (even arming black guards) and through the black ministers whom he had made his agents in the community, Ford was able to use the black workers to undermine the UAW organizing strikes. Gradually, black leaders came to trust union leaders and to realize that the union could be a better friend than Ford. And the UAW slowly began to go beyond expressions of sympathy for black needs and to take responsibility for restraining racism and ending discrimination. Still, their combined efforts were often undermined by racist companies (like Packard) inciting racist workers into ""hate strikes."" Ultimately, it was only when the government--acting through wartime boards--backed the union and forced management cooperation that progress was made. Even so, the 1943 riot about blacks living in the Sojourner Truth Projects was not even about integration, merely about black (rather than white) housing. Meier and Rudwick have used archival materials from all sides to piece together the tortuous path of race and labor relations. If the terrain is not unfamiliar (to readers of, e.g., Foner's Organized Labor and the Black Worker) the topography is new--and significantly revealing. Learn More

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