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Lucy Parsons: Freedom, Equality & Solidarity

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Writings & Speeches, 1878-1937

Edited & Introduced by Gale Ahrens

with an afterword by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz

'MORE DANGEROUS THAN 1000 RIOTERS!' That's what the Chicago police called Lucy ParsonsAmerica's most defiant and persistent anarchist agitator, whose cross-country speaking tours inspired hundreds of thousands of working people. Her friends and admirers included William orris, Peter Kropotkin, 'Big Bill' Haywood, Ben Reitman, Sam Dolgoff -and the groups in which she was active were just as varied: the Knights of Labor, IWW, Dil Pickle Club, International Labor Defense, & others. Here for the first time is a hefty selection of her powerful writings & speeches-on anarchism, women, race matters, class war, the IWW, and the U.S. injustice system.

'The most prominent black woman radical of the late nineteenth century, Lucy Parsons [was also] one of the brightest lights in the history of revolutionary socialism.'
--Robin D. G. Kelley, in Freedom Dreams: The Black Radical Imagination.

Edited and introduced by Gale Ahrens, here, for the first time, is a hefty selection of the writings and speeches of the woman the Chicago police called 'More dangerous than a thousand rioters!' 'Lucy Parsons' writings are among the best and strongest in the history of US anarchism. ...Her long and often traumatic experience of the capitalist injustice system - from the KKK terror in her youth, through Haymarket and the judicial murder of her husband, to the US government's war on the Wobblies - made her not 'just another victim' but an extraordinarily articulate witness to, and vehement crusader against, all injustice.' [from the introduction by Gale Ahrens] 'Lucy Parsons personae and historical role provide material for the makings of a truly exemplary figure.....anarchist, labor organizer, writer, editor, publisher, and dynamic speaker, a woman of color of mixed black, Mexican and Native American heritage, a founder of the 1880s Chicago Working women's Union that organized garment workers, called for equal pay for equal work, and even invited housewives to join with the demand of wages for housework; and later (1905) co-founder of the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), which made the organizing of women and people of color a priority....For a better understanding of the concept of direct action and its implications, no other historical figure can match the lessons provided by Lucy Parsons.' [from the Afterword by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz]

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Writings & Speeches, 1878-1937

Edited & Introduced by Gale Ahrens

with an afterword by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz

'MORE DANGEROUS THAN 1000 RIOTERS!' That's what the Chicago police called Lucy ParsonsAmerica's most defiant and persistent anarchist agitator, whose cross-country speaking tours inspired hundreds of thousands of working people. Her friends and admirers included William orris, Peter Kropotkin, 'Big Bill' Haywood, Ben Reitman, Sam Dolgoff -and the groups in which she was active were just as varied: the Knights of Labor, IWW, Dil Pickle Club, International Labor Defense, & others. Here for the first time is a hefty selection of her powerful writings & speeches-on anarchism, women, race matters, class war, the IWW, and the U.S. injustice system.

'The most prominent black woman radical of the late nineteenth century, Lucy Parsons [was also] one of the brightest lights in the history of revolutionary socialism.'
--Robin D. G. Kelley, in Freedom Dreams: The Black Radical Imagination.

Edited and introduced by Gale Ahrens, here, for the first time, is a hefty selection of the writings and speeches of the woman the Chicago police called 'More dangerous than a thousand rioters!' 'Lucy Parsons' writings are among the best and strongest in the history of US anarchism. ...Her long and often traumatic experience of the capitalist injustice system - from the KKK terror in her youth, through Haymarket and the judicial murder of her husband, to the US government's war on the Wobblies - made her not 'just another victim' but an extraordinarily articulate witness to, and vehement crusader against, all injustice.' [from the introduction by Gale Ahrens] 'Lucy Parsons personae and historical role provide material for the makings of a truly exemplary figure.....anarchist, labor organizer, writer, editor, publisher, and dynamic speaker, a woman of color of mixed black, Mexican and Native American heritage, a founder of the 1880s Chicago Working women's Union that organized garment workers, called for equal pay for equal work, and even invited housewives to join with the demand of wages for housework; and later (1905) co-founder of the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), which made the organizing of women and people of color a priority....For a better understanding of the concept of direct action and its implications, no other historical figure can match the lessons provided by Lucy Parsons.' [from the Afterword by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz]

Additional Information

Author Lucy Parsons
Publisher Charles H. Kerr
Format Paperback
Pages 184
ISBN-10 0882863002
ISBN-13 978-0882863009

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