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Race & Gender Analysis

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  1. From Chattel Slaves to Wage Slaves

    From Chattel Slaves to Wage Slaves

    $18.00

    The Dynamics of Labour Bargaining in the Americas

    Edited by Mary Turner

    This labour history reveals that chattel slaves like wage slaves conducted labour bargaining to improve their terms of work. The dynamics of labour bargaining fro slave, contract and wage workers in the Caribbean, the Southern States and Latin America is traced here over a period of two centuries. A distinguished group of scholars depicts the terms on which workers provided labour and the methods they used to improve them.

    * They establish that slave workers used verbal negotiations, go-slows, sabotage and strike action to establish informal contracts and cash rewards.

    * Contract workers, both Asian and European, used the same procedures, in some cases with less success, to bargain for the terms nominally secured by their contracts.

    * And wage workers, enmeshed in coercive legal structures, struggled to win legal rights to the methods of labour bargaining used by their slave ancestors.

    These studies demonstrate that, despite changes in legal status, the methods available for workers to improve their terms of work remained substantively the same. The book brings to question the time-honoured demarcation between chattel and wage slavery.

    Learn More
  2. Inventing the Immigration Problem - The Dillingham Commission and Its Legacy

    Inventing the Immigration Problem - The Dillingham Commission and Its Legacy

    $30.00

    In 1907 the U.S. Congress created a joint commission to investigate what many Americans saw as a national crisis: an unprecedented number of immigrants flowing into the United States. Experts―women and men trained in the new field of social science―fanned out across the country to collect data on these fresh arrivals. The trove of information they amassed shaped how Americans thought about immigrants, themselves, and the nation’s place in the world. Katherine Benton-Cohen argues that the Dillingham Commission’s legacy continues to inform the ways that U.S. policy addresses questions raised by immigration, over a century later. Within a decade of its launch, almost all of the commission’s recommendations―including a literacy test, a quota system based on national origin, the continuation of Asian exclusion, and greater federal oversight of immigration policy―were implemented into law. Inventing the Immigration Problem describes the labyrinthine bureaucracy, broad administrative authority, and quantitative record-keeping that followed in the wake of these regulations. Their implementation marks a final turn away from an immigration policy motivated by executive-branch concerns over foreign policy and toward one dictated by domestic labor politics. The Dillingham Commission―which remains the largest immigration study ever conducted in the United States―reflects its particular moment in time when mass immigration, the birth of modern social science, and an aggressive foreign policy fostered a newly robust and optimistic notion of federal power. Its quintessentially Progressive formulation of America’s immigration problem, and its recommendations, endure today in almost every component of immigration policy, control, and enforcement. Learn More
  3. Iron & Steel: Class, Race, and Community in Birmingham, Alabama 1875-1920

    Iron & Steel: Class, Race, and Community in Birmingham, Alabama 1875-1920

    $10.00

    In this study of Birmingham's iron and steel workers, Henry McKiven unravels the complex connections between race relations and class struggle that shaped the city's social and economic order. He also traces the links between the process of class formation and the practice of community building and neighborhood politics. According to McKiven, the white men who moved to Birmingham soon after its founding to take jobs as skilled iron workers shared a free labor ideology that emphasized opportunity and equality between white employees and management at the expense of less skilled black laborers. But doubtful of their employers' commitment to white supremacy, they formed unions to defend their position within the racial order of the workplace. This order changed, however, when advances in manufacturing technology created more semiskilled jobs and broadened opportunities for black workers. McKiven shows how these race and class divisions also shaped working-class life away from the plant, as workers built neighborhoods and organized community and political associations that reinforced bonds of skill, race, and ethnicity. Learn More
  4. Prisons & the American Conscience

    Prisons & the American Conscience

    $15.00

    In tracing the evolution of federal imprisonment, Paul W. Keve emphasizes the ways in which corrections history has been affected by and is reflective of other trends in the political and cultural life of the United States. The federal penal system has undergone substantial evolution over two hundred years. Keve divides this evolutionary process into three phases. During the first phase, from 1776 through the end of the nineteenth century, no federal prisons existed in the United States. Federal prisoners were simply boarded in state or local facilities. It was in the second phase, starting with the passage of the Three Prison Act by Congress in 1891, that federal facilities were constructed at Leavenworth and Atlanta, while the old territorial prison at McNeil Island in Washington eventually became, in effect, the third prison. In this second phase, the federal government began the enormous task of providing its own prison cells. Still, there was no effective supervisory force to make a prison system. In 1930, the Federal Bureau of Prisons was created, marking the third phase of the prison system’s evolution. The Bureau, in its first sixty years of existence, introduced numerous correctional innovations, thereby building an effective, centrally controlled prison system with progressive standards. Keve details the essential characteristics of this now mature system, guiding the reader through the historical process to the present day. Learn More
  5. Queering Anarchism: Addressing and Understanding Power and Desire

    Queering Anarchism: Addressing and Understanding Power and Desire

    $20.00

    What does it mean to "queer" the world around us? How does the radical refusal of the mainstream codification of LGBT identity as a new gender norm come into focus in the context of anarchist theory and practice? How do our notions of orientation inform our politics—and vice versa? Queering Anarchism brings together a diverse set of writings, ranging from the deeply theoretical to the playfully personal, that explore the possibilities of the concept of "queering," turning the dominant, and largely heteronormative, structures of belief and identity entirely inside out. Ranging in topic from the economy to disability, politics, social structures, sexual practice, interpersonal relationships, and beyond, the authors here suggest that queering might be more than a set of personal preferences—pointing toward the possibility of an entirely new way of viewing the world. Learn More
  6. Race and Revolution

    Race and Revolution

    $10.00

    A riveting inquiry into black history and American racism published here for the first time, Race and Revolution is a work of radiant insight and bold logic. Astonishingly advanced for its time, the document was originally drafted in 1933 as Communism and the Negro and was by far the most comprehensive statement on race produced by the Left Opposition, the dissenting Communist tendency led by Leon Trotsky. Race and Revolution places the black struggle for freedom and equality at the heart of American history. Racial oppression, Shachtman argues, can be comprehended only within the totality of social and class relations. The document culminates in a devastating polemic against the Communist Party’s call for a Black Belt state in the American South. A clarifying introduction by Christopher Phelps explains the document’s historical genesis, compares it to the views of Trotsky and C. L. R. James, and evaluates it in light of subsequent theoretical and historical developments. Learn More
  7. Race Class and Community in Southern Labor History

    Race Class and Community in Southern Labor History

    $20.00

    Under the leadership of Gary M. Fink and Merl E. Reed, Georgia State University hosts the Southern Labor Studies Conferences approximately every two years. The conferences have yielded two previous volumes, published in 1977 and 1981, and this volume, which contains selected papers from the seventh conference held in 1991. The essays in this volume will enlighten the reader on many important aspects of the history of southern labor, and they will also raise new questions to be explained by other scholars and future conferences. Learn More
  8. Race in America

    Race in America

    $10.00

    The Struggle for Equality

    Edited by Herbert Hill and James E. Jones, Jr.

    Many of the most important events in recent American history come alive in these pages as the strategies and programs, the victories and defeats of the civil rights movement are rigorously examined. A unique aspect of the book is that the human experience of active participants in this rich history is evoked through personal and often poignant acounts, such as those of Kenneth B. Clark, whoin a memorable autobiographical essay describes a long life devoted to the pursuit of racial justice, and Patricia J. Williams, who relates the contemporary struggles of African American women to the historical context of slavery and its aftermath.

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  9. Radical Works for Rebel Workers: Best of the IW 2015

    Radical Works for Rebel Workers: Best of the IW 2015

    $7.00

    Radical Works for Rebel Workers is a hand-picked collection of contemporary writing and imagery from a diverse crowd for the annual Working Writers Contest of the IWW. This Bilingual booklet features 10 contemporary works dealing with sexism, organizing, labor history and how to be a lifelong wobbly. Get two, and remember: IWW literature is better shared with a fellow worker! Learn More
  10. Selling Women Short

    Selling Women Short

    $25.00

    Selling Women Short: The Landmark Battle for Worker's Rights at Wal-Mart

    by Liza Featherstone

    Fortune magazine's 'Most Admired Company' for two years running, Wal-Mart offers its customers low prices and its shareholders big profits, but as freelance journalist Featherstone (Students Against Sweatshops) argues, this comes at great cost. Wal-Mart's success is based not only on its inexpensive merchandise or its popularity (Featherstone cites working-class shoppers and Paris Hilton among Wal-Mart's fans) but on bad labor practices. Using a close investigation of the class action suit Dukes v. Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. and extensive interviews with female workers, Featherstone indicts Wal-Mart for low wages, discriminatory policies and sexist practices. '[Our] district manager sometimes held lunch meetings at Hooters restaurants,' one female employee explains; another recalls being asked to work 'off the clock.' Failure to post open positions, exclusively male social gatherings, pay discrimination, 'persistent segregation of departments'—all are part, she argues, of Wal-Mart's deep-rooted culture of sexism. Many women employed full-time at Wal-Mart make so little that they are dependent on public assistance: 'It is curious that Wal-Mart—the icon of American free enterprise and self-sufficiency...—turns out to be one of the biggest 'welfare queens' of our time,' Featherstone writes. She doesn't give much time to related topics—racism, exploited overseas labor—but this is a clearly written and compelling book. It may not keep readers from their local Supercenters, but it should make them take a closer look at who's working the register.
    Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Learn More

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