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Race & Gender Analysis

Items 21 to 30 of 31 total

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  1. Splintered Sisterhood: Gender and Class in the Campaign against Woman Suffrage

    Splintered Sisterhood: Gender and Class in the Campaign against Woman Suffrage

    $5.00

    When Tennessee became the thirty-sixth and final state needed to ratify the Nineteenth Amendment in August 1920, giving women the right to vote, one group of women expressed bitter disappointment and vowed to fight against “this feminist disease.” Why this fierce and extended opposition? In Splintered Sisterhood, Susan Marshall argues that the women of the antisuffrage movement mobilized not as threatened homemakers but as influential political strategists. Drawing on surviving records of major antisuffrage organizations, Marshall makes clear that antisuffrage women organized to protect gendered class interests. She shows that many of the most vocal antisuffragists were wealthy, educated women who exercised considerable political influence through their personal ties to men in politics as well as by their own positions as leaders of social service committees. Under the guise of defending an ideal of “true womanhood,” these powerful women sought to keep the vote from lower-class women, fearing it would result in an increase in the “ignorant vote” and in their own displacement from positions of influence. This book reveals the increasingly militant style of antisuffrage protest as the conflict over female voting rights escalated. Splintered Sisterhood adds a missing piece to the history of women’s rights activism in the United States and illuminates current issues of antifeminism. Learn More
  2. The Politics of Immigrant Workers: Labor Activism and Migration in the World Economy Since 1830

    The Politics of Immigrant Workers: Labor Activism and Migration in the World Economy Since 1830

    $10.00

    Immigrant workers are as crucial to the world and national economies as they are socially and politically controversial. This provocative book explores the rise of the global working class in the 19th & 20th centuries by examining the experiences of a wide range of immigrant workers in the US, Europe, Asia and Africa. Are immigrant workers more conservative or radical than native-born workers? Under what circumstances do workers act together and when do they fail to co-operate? These are just two of the questions addressed in this important collection of essays. Learn More
  3. The Rebel Girl

    The Rebel Girl

    $12.00

    an Autobiography by Elizabeth Gurley Flynn

    My First Life (1906-1926

    First half of this legendary labor organizers autobiography. (Unfortunately, she never completed the second half). This volume covers the IWW years, the Lawrence textile strike, Patterson Silk Strike, conspiracy trials, syndicalism, first world war, Sacco and Vanzetti, and much, much more. Three hundred, fifty blistering pages.

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  4. The Story of Tatiana

    The Story of Tatiana

    $9.00

    In the shadow of the Jungfrau's peak that towers about Interlaken, Switzerland, Tatiana Leontiev carried out her Act. Historian Jacques Baynac recounts the life of this young Russian revolutionary before and after 1906, when she assassinated the man she believed was a Tsarist minister. Learn More
  5. The Strait

    The Strait

    $6.00

    Obenabi, the narrator, sings the story of his people confronting the European Invader. Emerging from the remembered experiences of his grandmothers, these personal tales of conflict, commerce, domestication, heroism, exchange and love are set in the Great Lakes region of North America. Most take place in splendid natural surroundings within walking distance of the Strait (now Detroit). Learn More
  6. Uncommon People: Resistance, Rebellion and Jazz

    Uncommon People: Resistance, Rebellion and Jazz

    $10.00

    Highlighting Eric Hobsbawm's passionate concern for the lives and struggles of ordinary men and women, Uncommon People brings back into print his classic works on labor history, working people, and social protest, pairing them with more recent, previously unpublished pieces on everything from the villainy of Roy Cohen to the genius of Count Basie, Duke Ellington, and Billie Holliday. Uncommon People offers both an exciting introduction for the uninitiated as well as a broad-ranging retrospective of the work of "the best-known living historian in the world" (The Times, London). Learn More
  7. Unionizing the Jungles

    Unionizing the Jungles

    $34.00

    Labor and Community in the Twentieth-Century Meat-packing Industry

    Edited by Shelton Stromquist and Marvin Bergman

    The rise and decline of industrial unionism in the packinghouse industry is a unique story that casts into bold relief the conflicts between labor and capital and the tensions based on race and gender in a perpetually changing workforce. The essayists in Unionizing the Jungles discuss the structurally distinctive features of the packinghouse industry - such as the fact that violence and extreme antiunionism were central elements of its culture - the primary actors in the union-building process, the roots of the distinctive interracialism of the United Packinghouse Workers of America and the explosion of industrial unionism in the 1930s, and the community-based militant unionism of the Independent Union of All Workers. Central themes throughout their essays include the role of African American workers, the constant battle for racial equality, and the eruption of gender conflict in the 1950s. Structural and technological changes in the corporate economy, the increased mobility of capital, and a more hostile political economy all contributed to the difficulties the labor movement faced in the 1980s and beyond. Focusing on the workplace and the community as arenas of conflict and accommodation, the new labor historians in these vigorous essays consider the historical and contemporary problems posed by the development of the packinghouse industry and its unions and reflect on the implications of this dramatic history for the larger story of the changing relations between labor and capital in mass production industry.

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  8. Witnesses for Change: Quaker Women Over Three Centuries

    Witnesses for Change: Quaker Women Over Three Centuries

    $7.50

    An exploration of the importance of Quaker women within American social and political history. Learn More
  9. Women and Work

    Women and Work

    $18.00

    Edited by Paula J. Dubeck and Kathryn Borman

    Women and Work: A Reader is the first book to offer a comprehensive global exploration of the challenges and career blocks that today's women face in the workplace. Despite benefiting from the struggles of previous generations, working women today still face a dismaying gantlet of sexual discrimination. This encyclopedic collection of 150 original articles by top scholars takes an interdisciplinary look at the issues faced by women of all ages, races, ethnic backgrounds, and nationalities in a spectrum of diverse occupations, from doctors to journalists, from nuns to soldiers. A variety of perspectives are used to investigate women's work experience at individual, organizational, and societal levels. Some of the essays focus on how women fare in a variety of occupations, summarizing women's representation in different jobs and discussing the unique problems they face. Others examine the influences of religious and educational institutions on women's career choices. Women and Work also reviews the history of protective legislation. The contributors consider current research on women's work interests, commitment, and satisfaction and examine sexual discrimination, harassment, and coercion, as well as gender bias in job evaluations and personnel decisions. They also explore various strategies for reducing or eliminating discrimination, harassment, and wage discrimination. Issues surrounding the work/family intersection are addressed, including when to have children, the difficulties that arise from the competing demands of work and child care, the consequences for women's careers, research examining the effects of mothers' employment on children's development, and issues surrounding eldercare. The volume also surveys the status of women in an international framework, analyzing women and work in selected countries, and is arranged to reflect the varying levels of development. Women and Work is a valuable reference book, providing a thoughtful overview of the issues facing working women. Paula J. Dubeck is an associate professor and head of the sociology department at the University of Cincinnati. Kathryn Borman is a professor of education and anthropology at the University of South Florida.

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  10. Workshop to Office: Two Generations of Italian Women in New York City, 1900-1950

    Workshop to Office: Two Generations of Italian Women in New York City, 1900-1950

    $23.00

    In turn-of-the-century New York, Italian immigrant daughters spent their youth in factories while their mothers did irregular wage labor as well as domestic work at home. By the I940s, Italian-American girls were in school, socializing and preparing for white-collar jobs that would not begin until they were eighteen. Drawing on a range of sources from censuses to high school yearbooks, Miriam Cohen examines shifting patterns in the family roles, work lives, and schooling of two generations of Italian-American women. Paying particular attention to the importance of these women's pragmatic daily choices, she documents how major social and political changes helped create new opportunities and constraints for the second generation. While financial need was a powerful factor in determining the behavior of the first generation women, Cohen shows, they and their daughters succeeded in adapting family survival strategies to new work patterns. Once the second generation was married, their careers mirrored those of the first in many ways: they raised children, cared for the home, and took on paid employment when necessary. Unlike their mothers, however, these Italian-American wives could also participate in the growing consumerism surrounding home and childcare. Throughout, Cohen compares the changing Italian-American experience with that of Jewish women, discovering significant similarities in these experiences by 1950. As well as presenting a nuanced portrait of one group of ethnic working-class women, Workshop to Office demonstrates the impact of political developments on individual lives. It will spark lively debates among students and scholars of social history, immigration history, labor history, women's history, and the history of education in the United States. Learn More

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