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  1. Beyond The Rebel Girl

    Beyond The Rebel Girl

    $22.95

    Women within the Industrial Workers of the World and outside that shared solidarity from 1905-1924 in the Pacific Northwest and their influence on generations of struggles for birth control, sexual liberation, labor equity, etc. Learn More
  2. Left Book Club Anthology

    Left Book Club Anthology

    $10.00

    The Left Book Club is something of a legend. Founded in 1936 to distribute cheap, radical books, it was a spectacular success, with nearly 60,000 members at its peak. Always controversial, its famous orange volumes told stories of life in Britain's industrial towns, rebellion in Hitler's Germany, and heroism in the Spanish Civil War. This anthology goes back to the monthly selections themselves and recaptures the fervor and idealism of the 1930s. It includes extracts from many of the Club's most popular books, including Orwell's The Road to Wigan Pier, Koestler's Spanish Testament, Edgar Snow's Red Star Over China, and Wilfred Macartney's Walls Have Mouths. Paul Laity introduces each extract and contributes an excellent general introduction explaining the political and cultural context of the Club. Learn More
  3. On Our Way to Oyster Bay - Mother Jones and Her March for Children's Rights

    On Our Way to Oyster Bay - Mother Jones and Her March for Children's Rights

    $17.95

    Though eight-year-old Aidan and his friend Gussie want to go to school, like many other children in 1903, they work twelve hours, six days a week, at a cotton mill in Pennsylvania instead. So when the millworkers decide to go on strike, the two friends join the picket line. Maybe now life will change for them. But when a famous labor reformer named Mother Jones comes to hear of the millworkers' demands, she tells them they need to do more than just strike. “Troubled by all she had seen, Mother Jones wanted to end child labor. But what could she do? Why, organize a children's march and bring the message right to President Theodore Roosevelt at his summer home in Oyster Bay, of course!” Written by Monica Kulling, with vibrant illustrations by Felicita Sala, this picture book uses an entertaining story about fictitious characters to bring a real event in history to vivid life. The actual march raised awareness across North America and contributed to the passage of the first child labor laws. It offers an excellent model for how ordinary people, including children, can make a difference by standing up for what's right. For lesson planning, there's more about Mother Jones, the march and child labor laws at the end of the book. There's also information about child labor today and concrete suggestions for getting involved and helping, making this book perfect for discussions about social justice, activism and citizenship. Learn More
  4. Three Strikes: Miners, Musicians, Salesgirls, and the Fighting Spirit of Labor's Last Century

    Three Strikes: Miners, Musicians, Salesgirls, and the Fighting Spirit of Labor's Last Century

    $10.00

    Three renowned historians present stirring tales of labor: Howard Zinn tells the grim tale of the Ludlow Massacre, a drama of beleaguered immigrant workers, Mother Jones, and the politics of corporate power in the age of the robber barons. Dana Frank brings to light the little-known story of a successful sit-in conducted by the 'counter girls' at the Detroit Woolworth's during the Great Depression. Robin D. G. Kelley's story of a movie theater musicians' strike in New York asks what defines work in times of changing technology. Learn More
  5. Homestead: The Households of a Mill Town

    Homestead: The Households of a Mill Town

    $27.95

    Homestead, first published in 1910 as one volume in the classic Pittsburgh Survey, describes daily life in a community that was dominated economically and physically by the giant Homestead Works of the United States Steel Corporation. Homestead, just across the Monongahela River from Pittsburgh, developed as a completely separate city -- a true mill town settled by newer immigrants and shaped in its attitudes by the infamous Homestead Strike of 1892. Learn More
  6. Black Detroit and the rise of the UAW

    Black Detroit and the rise of the UAW

    $8.50

    The political alliance between the United Auto Workers and the NAACP-led blacks of Detroit blossomed with Walter Reuther's becoming a member of the board of the NAACP and marching with Martin Luther King. In retrospect it seemed to the matchmakers, like R. J. Thomas of the UAW and Walter White of the NAACP, like a marriage made in heaven. But Meier and Rudwick, who have written extensively on black issues, demonstrate that it was a relationship that was forged slowly and painfully through the organizing struggles of the New Deal and World War II. At first, black auto workers resisted unionization. Henry Ford had taken a paternal interest in them and given them more jobs, better pay, and better living conditions than any other employer. With their loyalty to Ford, suspicion of racist white workers, fear of the seniority system, under-representation in union offices, and concentration in the worst jobs, black workers were ripe to be used as strikebreakers. Working through his vicious Service Department (even arming black guards) and through the black ministers whom he had made his agents in the community, Ford was able to use the black workers to undermine the UAW organizing strikes. Gradually, black leaders came to trust union leaders and to realize that the union could be a better friend than Ford. And the UAW slowly began to go beyond expressions of sympathy for black needs and to take responsibility for restraining racism and ending discrimination. Still, their combined efforts were often undermined by racist companies (like Packard) inciting racist workers into ""hate strikes."" Ultimately, it was only when the government--acting through wartime boards--backed the union and forced management cooperation that progress was made. Even so, the 1943 riot about blacks living in the Sojourner Truth Projects was not even about integration, merely about black (rather than white) housing. Meier and Rudwick have used archival materials from all sides to piece together the tortuous path of race and labor relations. If the terrain is not unfamiliar (to readers of, e.g., Foner's Organized Labor and the Black Worker) the topography is new--and significantly revealing. Learn More
  7. The Wobblies In Their Heyday

    The Wobblies In Their Heyday

    $23.00

    Based on extensive archival research, the IWW in Its Heyday looks at the union during the World War I era when it was able to organize militant strikes that drastically curtailed production in key industries, copper mining and lumber. It also looks at the debates within the union on how to build a broadly based movement to oppose the war. The book also details the coordinated campaign of repression launched by the administration of Woodrow Wilson with the intention of crushing the Wobblies. Learn More
  8. The CNT in the Spanish Revolution Volume 1

    The CNT in the Spanish Revolution Volume 1

    $28.00

    The CNT in the Spanish Revolution is the history of one of the most original and audacious, and arguably also the most far-reaching, of all the twentieth-century revolutions. It is the history of the giddy years of political change and hope in 1930s Spain, when the so-called ‘Generation of ’36’, Peirats’ own generation, rose up against the oppressive structures of Spanish society. It is also a history of a revolution that failed, crushed in the jaws of its enemies on both the reformist left and the reactionary right. Learn More
  9. Always On Strike

    Always On Strike

    $16.00

    Frank Little is considered by some to be the greatest organizer produced by the U.S. labor movement, and yet precious little has been written about the famous Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) agitator. Little was a key leader of the country’s first free speech fights, organized a number of mass strikes, and was considered such a threat to corporate interests that he was lynched by company thugs for decry attempts at strike breaking. Police and government officials not only turned a blind eye to his murder, they later used his words and actions to justify a campaign to scapegoat and persecute other members of the IWW. Always on Strike chronicles and critically engages with Little’s exploits in hopes of exposing a new generation of radicals to his life, legacy and politics. Learn More
  10. Race Class and Community in Southern Labor History

    Race Class and Community in Southern Labor History

    $20.00

    Under the leadership of Gary M. Fink and Merl E. Reed, Georgia State University hosts the Southern Labor Studies Conferences approximately every two years. The conferences have yielded two previous volumes, published in 1977 and 1981, and this volume, which contains selected papers from the seventh conference held in 1991. The essays in this volume will enlighten the reader on many important aspects of the history of southern labor, and they will also raise new questions to be explained by other scholars and future conferences. Learn More

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